• Title: Aimee
  • Author: Mary Beth Miller
  • Released: 2004-02-09
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 288
  • ISBN: 0142400254
  • ISBN13: 978-0142400258
  • ASIN: 0142400254
From Publishers Weekly First-novelist Miller creates an intense psychological drama narrated by a troubled teen recently acquitted of murder charges. The question "Did Zoe really help best friend Aimee commit suicide?" hangs precariously between the lines of Zoe's journal, where (according to her psychologist) she is to write about her past, "what you felt, what you thought, what was important to you." Zoe pointedly avoids discussing the fateful night of Aimee's death, but she candidly describes her present emotions. She openly expresses her scorn for therapists, her resentment of her mother, her longing to see old friends (whom she is forbidden to contact) and her avoidance of a girl at her new school (the girl flirts with death the same way Aimee did). Tension mounts as Zoe edges ever closer to the truth about Aimee's death, but details remain below the surface until the cathartic climax, when Zoe finally recaps the horrific chain of events and must determine whether or not the tragedy could have been prevented. While the premise involves extremes of behavior, readers will readily recognize the feelings and conflicts that fuel this engrossing novel. Investigating the tensions between teens and the adults in their lives, the author raises hard-hitting questions that resound all the more powerfully for her refusal to simplify the answers. Ages 14-up.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal Grade 9 & Up--Zoe is one angry 17-year-old. Having recently been acquitted of assisting her best friend's suicide, she is seeing a court-appointed psychiatrist who has suggested she write the journal that forms this book. The entries slip backward and forward in time and Zoe has complaints about 99 percent of her life. She feels that no adults have ever paid sufficient attention to her wants and needs and that when they DO pay attention they are controlling and stifling and stupid. Given that her family has moved to another town and she is forbidden to communicate with her hometown friends, Zoe has good reason to feel hung out to dry. And given that her parents seem to be hoping that she will get over Aimee's death and the trial and be a happy high school senior, it's no wonder that she's severely depressed. Bit by bit, the story of her old group-their risky behavior (including drinking and sex) and frequent challenges to authority-emerges from Zoe's writing. The lack of genuine communication between the younger and older generations provides the tragic climate for Aimee's suicide and hinders Zoe's ability to recover. Her voice is not always consistent but her unhappiness and her grittiness are difficult to dismiss. There are a lot of issues here that bear addressing, and Miller handles them in a way that teens will easily grasp. By the end, Zoe has even managed to gain some perspective and has decided to get on with her life.
Miriam Lang Budin, Chappaqua Public Library, NY
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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